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Mā te ngaruru ō ngā whenua maru ō Ngāti Awa, ka noho momoho ngā taonga koiora,

 taonga tuku iho, hei oranga whānui mō ngā whakatipuranga.

As the lands of Ngāti Awa flourish, opportunties abound for future generations to enjoy their ecological, environmental, and cultural uniqueness.
Korehaha Whakahau Logo (1)

KO WAI MĀTAU | PROJECT INFORMATION

Korehāhā Whakahau is the first Iwi-led Predator Free 2050 project, seeking to eradicate possums from 4,700ha of land within the rohe of Ngāti Awa, including Whakatāne, Ōhope, and Ōhiwa.

Over a five-year period, the project will contribute to the protection and enhancement of te taiao, creating career pathways that build the capacity and capability of Ngāti Awa to be kaitiaki.

Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Awa CEO Leonie Simpson says Korehāhā Whakahau is an important part of a kete of mahi that Te Runanga o Ngāti Awa is developing. “The project will help Ngāti Awa people reach their aspirations to care for and restore the taiao. We are aiming for long term outcomes that are intergenerational.”

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POSSUM KILLS
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DETECTION SITES
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ZIP POSSTOP TRAPS

HE AHA E ARO AI MĀTAU KI NGĀ PAIHAMU? | WHY POSSUMS?

He raru nui te paihamu ki ngā taonga koiora ō kōnei | Possums pose a huge threat to our taonga species.

Since being introduced in 1858, there are an estimated 30 million possums living throughout Aotearoa. Possums intervene with the natural ecosystems and habitats of native birds. Dairy and deer farmers are also at risk of possums spreading bovine tuberculosis (tb). Possum numbers in the area have been knocked down to levels thanks to the work done before us by Council and Community Groups, and the technology for possum trapping and monitoring has now advanced to a point where eradication, without the use of toxins, is feasible. The Eastern Bay of Plenty has retained important populations of kiwi, weka, kōkako, New Zealand falcon/kārearea, Australasian bittern/matuku, Banded rail/moho pererū and New Zealand robin/toutouwai, which have the potential to benefit from the enhanced predator control and restoration efforts.

  • $35 million worth of damage caused by possums on New Zealand farms every year.
  • 21,000 tonnes of vegetation consumed collectively by possums each night.
  • Ōhope and Ōhiwa are home to some of the last remnants of Pōhutukawa remnants in Aotearoa, of which possums, in particular, are a threat to.

ngā uri o ngāti awa

 Korehāhā Whakahau is creating social, economic, and environmental outcomes for our whānau, as well as demonstrating our capability to administer large-scale projects. 

Korehāhā Whakahau is a part of a suite of exciting projects being undertaken by Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Awa, for the benefit of our collective resilience as uri of Ngāti Awa.

NGĀ KAIMAHI | OUR TEAM

Korehāhā Whakahau has employed 14 new, dedicated roles so far, seven of which were previously unemployed. Our kaimahi and kaiarahi also receive extensive training and development, both personally and professionally, gaining transferable skills that build our internal capability.

NGĀ KARERE | PROJECT UPDATES

MOVING INTO THE SCENIC RESERVES

We have started trapping and monitoring activity in the Ōhope Scenic Reserve, with plans to be in Mokoroa and Kōhī Scenic Reserves by September.

This is a progression north from where we have been previously working, in the southern defense-line boundary of the project area. Working in public reserves means that we have the opportunity to engage more with our community, as well as the responsibility to ensure public safety.

If you see our team in the area say hello! If you come across our equipment while exploring, refrain from handling and take care.

KIA KŌKIRI! | GOING LIVE!

Korehāhā Whakahau has partnered with Zero Invasive Predators (ZIP) to utilise the latest in trapping technology and innovation.

In April, we went live with the ZIP OutPost automated reporting system; a system that enables timely transfer of field data using ZIP MagNodes, reducing the amount of time required to check trap lines. These are electronic nodes that detect the status of a trap and use LoRa (low-powered radio) to let us know when a trap has been activated.

Using new technology is not without its challenges! And we love the opportunity to learn, evolve, and refine our practice as we go.

WHAKATŌNGIA TE MAURI | SETTING THE FOUNDATIONS

The first six months of the project have focused on the training and development of our team and project identity. Launching our brand, gatheirng information on the project area, and starting to set up our detection systems in the Ngāti Awa Farm and Ohakana Island have been encouraging achievements for us so far. 

We continue to learn more and more each day about the technology, the project area. and each other, and we are excited by the momentum we are creating.

WHAKAPĀTUHI MAI | CONTACT US

Tukua Mai He Karere! Send us a message! 

If you have queries, need mroe information, or want to let us know about possum activity, we would love to hear from you. Fill out the form below!

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If you want to register with Ngāti Awa, please email register@ngatiawa.iwi.nz or call 073070760

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Our Member Portal is currently undergoing maintenance and will be back up and running as soon as possible!

We apologies for the inconvenience. 

Pātaka Kai & Kaimoana Permits

To inquire about Pātaka Kai and Kaimoana permits please contact one of the following:
 

Weekdays 8.30am to 5pm
Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Awa | 07 3070760

Public Holidays & Afterhours
Charlie Bluett | 027 524 7710
Kataraina Monika | 027 235 3923